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How to help your teen bounce back after results day

MyTutor – the UK’s most trusted tutoring – platform shares their go-to guide to help your teen recover their confidence like a champion if results day doesn’t go as planned.

Help them to face the facts
Sometimes a wake-up call can be exactly what’s needed. Having them realize what they need to work on is essential for growth, and gives them a chance to come back stronger, with a real understanding of the challenge they are facing. Cheesy it may be, but it’s a much more effective and productive way for them to take the results. It won’t work in their favour to assure them that their results didn’t reflect their performance, they knew everything, or they couldn’t have worked harder. They now have a choice to make: repeat their exams and fail again or work hard and fight for the future they want.
 
Sometimes, a little extra effort is all that’s needed. However, it’s also true that hard work isn’t always enough. Your teen may need some extra guidance from someone who’s been through GCSEs before to know what went wrong so they can change their approach productively. Finding the perfect tutor is one option that can make a huge difference to help your teen boost their grades.

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Working out what went wrong
It may be that they haven’t understood a few concepts from the start, or that they have trouble with key terms in your subject; it could even be exam technique. For example, GCSE English requires a certain writing style to turn around good grades, so writing a piece void of the learned style in class won’t do them any favours. Success in a subject is sometimes very simple yet realizing that they might be in need of guided advice and a road map to get there can be key.

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Being positive
When your teen realizes and accepts what went wrong, the best thing they can do is be positive! They get another chance to prove themself and show their hard work. There’s no shame in adding an extra year at school - as long as it’s worth it. They’ll get to university (or job, apprenticeship, internship etc.) with more experience, knowledge and, faith in themselves and their work.
 

Connect them with people like them
Sometimes the real challenge can be that your teen feels completely alone: if nobody helps them figure out where they went wrong, they can feel very isolated – especially if all their friends did better than them. This is why it’s crucial for teens to speak with students who have been through the same exam periods as them, like the Tutors at MyTutor.  They’ve been there, lived and breathed GCSEs and, moreover, know how to get it right. It gives your teen the chance to sit down and talk to someone who knows how to revise, who can give them all their tips and tricks, who knows what the examiners want and can help them identify where they’re going wrong.

Working out what went wrong
It may be that they haven’t understood a few concepts from the start, or that they have trouble with key terms in your subject; it could even be exam technique. For example, GCSE English requires a certain writing style to turn around good grades, so writing a piece void of the learned style in class won’t do them any favours. Success in a subject is sometimes very simple yet realizing that they might be in need of guided advice and a road map to get there can be key.